‘En Pointe’ on The Way we Do Kinbaku

ITALIAN TEXT BELOW.

While I started to practice and to study traditional Japanese kinbaku only one year ago, my partner and I were completely fascinated about that since the first time we were involved into.

We also use to look at other riggers or kinbakushis and their models. We watched pictures, videos, live performances or play sessions during peer ropes or play parties.

The most of the time, I see that on the one hand, the most of the riggers pretended to be ‘Japanese-styled’, on the other hand, I am not able to gain what they would like to transmit.

Particularly, I am not able to get why they are doing something and what kind of reaction do they expect from their partners. I am not just talking about technique, I am referring to something deeper. There is a very interesting article on KinbakuToday which talks about that, Quelle Surprise or “I Tie and I Know Things” by Zetsu Nawa. I totally agree with those ideas, but in the following lines, I will not talk about this theme.

A lot of people pretend to be into something which is a piece of Japanese culture, without being from that Country!

The result? They (should I say… we?!) act like something which is a stereotype, with great lacks in term of communication and emotions.

I confess, I know almost nothing about Japan. I started to look at at the Japanese aesthetic and the way they communicate only a few months ago. But the more I see, the more I understand that it’s difficult for western people to act, communicate and interact in the Japanese way.

Anyway, I’m strongly sure that there is something which also a western person like me (and the most of us) could get, in order not to appear like a dummy acting on a scene. So what about to think that kinbaku is not too different from the classic dance?

In my opinion, there are several common points.

THEORY. A lot of people believes that experience and practice are the best teachers. But how can you do something without knowing what to do and – especially – why and when do that? Like the fundamental positions from first to fifth in ballet, also every kinbaku style has its basis which quite commonly are single and double column ties. It’s something more than HOW to do a basic pattern, it’s why, as I told before. You must know that pattern clear in your mind, step-by-step, you need that pattern is a part of you.

PRACTICE. The daughter of the theory, of course. You can master the theory of basic and may be of intermediate pattern, like the On Pointe Technique (as your TK) in ballet, but to become a good practice you need to try and retry. A lot of times, of course, until you arrive at the point to perform also advanced pattern without the need to use your memory or maybe without watching, using both the hands indifferently, or using every finger or just a couple of them.

TRADITION. Why thousands of people today like to go to the theatre still to watch something which is more than 100 years old like The Swan Lake (1876) or The Nutcracker (1892)? I will leave this question open, hoping you will think about it. Of course, every kinbaku style is younger compared to classic ballet but every of them has some “traditional” pattern. The most of the people I see or I met are tormented with the need to do something new, something more, something different.

I don’t’ know if the reason is that they get bored soon of something already done some times or because they need to be distinctive, but the most of the time the result is they do something which is no communicative, ugly or empty.

INNOVATION. Wait a minute. I talked about tradition before… Is it a contradiction? No, it is not. Innovation can be seen on several levels, both in ballet and kinbaku. We can have technical innovation, pattern innovation, scene innovation, style innovation and so on. But it really works only if it’s based on the solid knowledge of the tradition. For sure, Vaganova Academy of Russian Ballet teaches something which is strongly addressed like ‘classic’ and traditional, but teaching method could not be the same of the beginning of the XX century. Everything evolved, from technique to aesthetic, everything is still subjected to be pushed to the maximum. In a very similar way, I am convinced that kinbaku is something dynamic, which evolve day by day, but it is impossible to detach it from tradition, remembering that there is no new without old, there is nothing dynamic without something of static.

TALENT. No need to be ‘politically correct’. In our world, talents do exist. If you start to study ballet and to practice in class with other people, you will easily see how someone will succeed in an exercise faster than some other. It’s natural. I know that there are a lot of things that could be taught and learned. In reality, the most do. That’s why ballet could be performed by anyone. But also in kinbaku, you have to be honest with yourself. Only a few number of kinbakushis can reach or overreach certain levels. So please, focus on yourself. Explore your attitude, your willingness and do your best on your way, day by day.

STYLE. Usually, no dancer ‘jumps’ from a school to another. Maybe in the very beginning, it could be difficult to choose the most suitable one, but when he/she succeed to find the right one they follow it and study it until they master the art of that school. Why should this be different in kinbaku? This could be seen as an invitation to fight against mediocrity: going deeper into something you like would give you a greater satisfaction compared to ‘knowing a bit of everything by knowing nothing’.

EDUCATION. From the point of view of the educator. If on the one hand talents exist, on the other a good level would be easily achieved with the proper method of teaching. One of the most effective factors which could be used as the indicator for the capability and the efficiency of the method of the teacher/educator could be his own students/fellows. Of course, when you see ballet masters from different school dancing you will enjoy them (apart from personal tastes) but it’s not said that every good dancer would be a good teacher! So far, try to look at the students of different kinbaku educators, talk with them and ask them everything which could give you the information you need.

SYNERGY. The most of the time, we talk about riggers and how do they tie. In my own opinion, we should look at the couple! Of course, the bunny is the centre of the scene, but the most beautiful one tied by the most amazing rigger would be nothing if they have no affinity. They must be in syntony, in the very similar way as the dancers are on a stage. Every movement should be balanced, every step should be mindful and on time and exactly in the same way every rope should be another string which would reinforce the affinity of the partners.

COMMUNICATION. It’s not physical exercises. Not only, at least. Barely rarely someone decides to dance and to study ballet because he/she wants to make fitness. Dance wants to express something, through a lot of channels (music, movements, faces, expressions, and so on). Only if you give to your ropes a meaning that you want to transmit to someone (your partner, someone who’s watching…) you are doing a kinbaku session. Otherwise, it’s only physical practice.

SENSE OF BEAUTY. You are tieing her. You have to make her beautiful. You must her beauty pass through your ropes and come out in the rightest way, no matter what you would like to communicate, it is a higher level. Who would like to see a ballet where dancers show something ugly, not pleasant, uncoordinated, homely? And like the dancer, you have to deal with it: it’s not a choice. It’s ok, you can tie her just for having some ‘extreme’ sex or to play other domination games. That’s cool but it’s not kinbaku. Why don’t you use other more user-friendly stuff if your aim is only to block her? Also, even if you are interested only in the technical part you have to recognise that beautiful thing works better than ugly things.

IDENTIFICATION. Usually, we think that people act during a ballet. That’s true, but it is only the first level of interpretation. To act like a swan it is not sufficient to feel like a swan: you must be a swan! The best kinbaku I have seen was not a play-act. There were true people being their self, even if they were on a scene. For dancers, the scene disappears, the audience vanishes and in a similar way when we tie or be tied it feels like to be in a bell jar: it’s only you and your partner, it doesn’t matter how many people are watching you. Anyway, it’s nice to be observed and exposure could be a central point, because it could create a vortex of feelings both in the rigger and in the bottom.

Maybe there will be a lot of other similarities and common point that could be listed, but I would like to conclude this writing with a personal consideration: let your ropes become a way to dance with your partner. Express yourselves and focus on why and how to do something. Try to improve day by day and let your kinbaku be an erotic ballet and not only a worthless trend nor a pointless circus.

__________________________________________________________________________

 

Benché abbia iniziato a studiare Kinbaku in stile tradizionale giapponese appena un anno fa, io e la mia compagna siamo rimasti completamente affascinati da questa disciplina sin dalla prima volta in cui vi ci siamo affacciati.

Spesso trascorriamo un po’ di tempo ad osservare altri rigger o kinbakushi e le loro modelle, guardando foto, video, live performance e play session durante i vari peer rope o play party.

Il più delle volte mi capita di notare che malgrado la maggior parte dei rigger voglia vestire i panni del kinbakushi in stile giapponese, personalmente non riesco a recepire ciò che essi vorrebbero trasmettere.

In particolare, mi sfugge il perchè facciano una determinata cosa e come essa sia collegata con la reazione che dovrebbero aspettarsi dal proprio partner. Non ne faccio un discorso puramente tecnico, mi riferisco a qualcosa di più profondo. C’è un articolo molto interessante su KinbakuToday che parla proprio della motivazione alla base del fare corde, dal titolo  Quelle Surprise or “I Tie and I Know Things” , scritto da Zetsu Nawa. Sono completamente d’accordo su ciò che esprime l’autore ma non mi dilungherò su questo tema nelle prossime righe.

Piuttosto, porto l’attenzione sul fatto che una moltitudine di persone vuole addentrarsi in una pratica giapponese senza essere giapponese!

Risultato? Non fanno (forse dovrei dire… non facciamo?!) altro che agire come uno stereotipo, con grandi lacune e carenze in termini di comunicazione ed emozioni.

Lo ammetto, conosco praticamente nulla sul Giappone. Ho iniziato a studiare l’estetica giapponese e il loro modo di comunicare solo pochi mesi fa, ma più vado avanti più capisco quanto sia difficile per noi occidentali comunicare e interagire in stile giapponese.

In ogni caso sono fortemente convinto che c’è qualcosa che un occidentale come me (e come quasi tutti noi) possa comprendere e fare proprio, per non apparire come una caricatura: avete mai pensato quanto di fatto il kinbaku sia non troppo diverso dalla danza classica?

Personalmente, ritengo che abbiano svariati punti in comune.

TEORIA. Siamo soliti affermare che esperienza e pratica siano le migliori insegnanti possibili. Tuttavia, come possiamo fare qualcosa senza conoscere cosa fare e – soprattutto – perchè e quando farla? Come nella danza esistono le posizioni fondamentali dalla prima alla quinta, allo stesso modo  ogni stile di kinbaku ha le sue basi, tra le quali comunemente il single column tie e il double column tie. Come ho già detto, teoria è qualcosa in più di sapere COME fare un pattern di base. E’ conoscerne il perchè. Occorre avere quel pattern chiaro nella propria mente, passo dopo passo, finchè esso non diventa parte di noi stessi.

PRATICA. Di sicuro, la figlia della teoria. Si può essere il depositario della teoria sia di base che avanzata, come si potrebbe conoscere perfettamente la Tecnica En Pointe (che possiamo dire essere il TK nel kinbaku), ma per diventare un buon ballerino si ha bisogno di provare e riprovare. Un sacco di volte, finchè non si arriva al punto in cui si riesce a svolgere pattern avanzati senza aver bisogno di ricordare o addirittura di guardare, deve essere indifferente legare con la mano destra o con la sinistra, usare tutte le dita o solo due.

TRADIZIONE. Come mai ancora oggi a migliaia di persone piace andare in teatro per vedere qualcosa che è vecchio di oltre cento anni, come ad esempio Il lago dei cigni (1876) o Lo schiaccianoci (1892)? Lascerò la domanda aperta, sperando che possa essere uno spunto di riflessione. Di sicuro, qualsiasi stile di kinbaku è più giovane se confrontato con gli spettacoli di danza classica, ma ognuno di essi ha alcuni “patter tradizionali”. La gran maggioranza dei rigger che vedo o che incontro sono ossessionati dal bisogno di fare qualcosa di nuovo, qualcosa in più, qualcosa di diverso. Non conosco la ragione del perchè qualcosa già fatta alcune volte li annoii così rapidamente o del perchè sentano l’esigenza di doversi distinguere, ma cosi facendo ricadono in quanto detto sopra, ossia spesso ottengono qualcosa di non comunicativo, brutto o vuoto.

INNOVAZIONE. Fermi tutti. Ho appena finito di parlare di tradizione… Non sarà una incongruenza? No, assolutamente. L’innovazione può strutturarsi su svariati livelli, nella danza come nel kinbaku: tecnica, pattern, scena, stile e cosi vià possono essere innovati. Ciò è veramente possibile solo se ci si basa su una solida conoscenza della tradizione. Di sicuro, la Accademia di danza Vaganova insegna qualcosa che è etichettato come fortemente ‘classico’ e tradizionale ma il metodo di insegnamento non sarà più quello degli inizi del XX secolo. Ogni cosa evolve, dalla tecnica all’estetica e allo stesso tempo è soggetta ad una ricerca che cerca di estrarre il massimo. In maniera analoga, sono convinto che il kinbaku sia qualcosa di dinamico, in continua evoluzione, ma allo stesso tempo non possa distaccarsi dalla sua tradizione, ricordando che non c’è nuovo senza vecchio e che non esiste dinamico senza qualcosa di statico.

TALENTO. Senza mezzi termini, nel nostro mondo i talenti esistono. Se si inizia a studiare danza e a seguire le lezioni di un corso con altre persone, si può facilmente notare come alcuni riescano negli esercizi più velocemente di altri. E’ naturale. Allo stesso tempo, è vero che quasi tutto può essere insegnato e appreso: è il motivo per cui la danza è una disciplina aperta a tutti. Tuttavia, così come anche nel kinbaku, occorre essere onesti con se stessi: solo un modesto numero di kinbakushi può raggiungere o superare certi liverlli. Perciò, proviamo a concentrarci su noi stessi. Esploriamo le attitudini, la volontà e facciamo del nostro meglio seguendo la propria strada, giorno dopo giorno.

STILE. Di norma, nessun ballerino è solito ‘saltare’ da una scuola ad un’altra. Magari quando si è davvero alle primissime armi può essergli difficile scegliere quale sia la scuola che gli piacerebbe seguire, ma una volta trovata egli la frequenterà e studierà l’arte che gli viene insegnata fino a renderla del tutto propria. Perchè mai ciò dovrebbe essere diverso nel kinbaku? Lo si potrebbe vedere com un invito a combattere la mediocrità: entrare nel profondo dettaglio di qualcosa che piace può dare molta più soddisfazione confrontato con il conoscere un po’ di tutto non conoscendo in realtà nulla.

INSEGNAMENTO. Dal punto di vista di colui che insegna, l’educatore. Se da un lato è vero che i talenti esistono, dall’altro con un metodo appropriato di insegnamento è possibile raggiungere un buon livello anche in tempi brevi. Osservare gli studenti e gli allievi di un educatore può essere uno dei più efficaci indicatori della effettiva capacità di insegnamento.  Ovviamente, quando osservi danzare dei professionisti (anche di scuole diverse) non potrai che finire con l’apprezzarli (gusti personali a parte) ma non è detto che un buon ballerino sia necessariamente un buon educatore! Pertanto il consiglio è di provare a osservare gli studenti dei vari insegnanti di kinbaku, parlare con loro e chiedere qualsiasi tipo di informazione sul loro percorso di cui potresti avere bisogno.

SINERGIA. Il più delle volte, ci ritroviamo a parlare del rigger e di come leghi. Personalmente, ritengo che dovremmo guardare la coppia. D’accordo, la modella è il centro della scena, ma la bunny più graziosa legata dal rigger più emozionante non sarà poi tanto valorizzata se tra i due non c’è affinità. I due dovranno essere in sintonia, esattamente come i ballerini sul palco. Ogni movimento dovrà essere armonioso, ogni passo ponderato e al tempo giusto ed esattamente allo stesso modo ogni corda dovrà essere un ulteriore legame che si aggiunge a rinforzare l’affinità dei due partner.

COMUNICAZIONE. Una volta per tutte, non è esercizio fisico! Non solo, quantomeno. Credo sia rarissimo che qualcuno inizi a studiare e praticare danza classica solo perchè voglia tenersi in forma. La danza vuole esprimere qualcosa, attraverso numerosi canali: musica, movimento, espressioni facciali, coreografie e così via. Si può essere il protagonista di una sessione di kinbaku solo dando alle proprie corde un significato che si vuole trasmettere a qualcuno (il partner che viene legato o magari a qualcuno che osserva). Diversamente, è solo educazione fisica.

SENSO DELLA BELLEZZA. Mi rivolgo direttamente al rigger. Nel momento in cui la stai legando, sei in dovere di renderla bella. Devi far si che la sua bellezza passi attraverso il suo corpo legato e risalti nel modo più appropriato, non importa cosa hai intenzione di comunicare: si parla di un livello più alto. Chi vorrebbe vedere un’opera di danza dove i ballerini sono sgradevoli, non aggraziati, scoordinati, o rozzi? Allo stesso modo, non puoi che far fronte a questo concetto: non è una scelta. Certo, potrai divertirti molto legando il tuo partner anche solo per intraprendere dei giochi di dominazione o magari ad un letto per fare sesso ‘estremo’ o alternativo. E’ fantastico e giustissimo, ma non è kinbaku. Perché allora non usare degli oggetti sicuramente più rapidi ed efficaci delle corde, se lo scopo è solo l’immobilizzazione? Infine, anche se si è interessati solo alla componente tecnica, bisogna riconoscere che, solitamente, una cosa funziona meglio quando paga l’occhio, piuttosto che il contrario.

IDENTIFICAZIONE. Siamo convinti che coloro che danzano recitino, durante un balletto. E’ vero, ma ciò costituisce solo un primo livello di interpretazione. Per interpretare il ruolo di un cigno non è sufficiente studiare e imparare una parte e sentirsi un cigno, occorre essere un cigno! Il più bel kinbaku che mi è capitato di osservare non era una recita. Ho visto persone vere essere se stessi nonostante fossero su un palco. Colui che danza afferma che il palco sparisce e il pubblico si dissolve; allo stesso modo quando si lega o si viene legati è come essere in una campana di vetro: sei solo con il tuo partner, non importa quante persone ti stiano osservando. Occorre altresì riconoscere che è bello essere osservati e che la ‘esposizione’ del partner può essere un punto centrale nel kinbaku, perché crea un vortice di sensazioni ed emozioni sia nel rigger che nella bottom.

Magari è possibile trovare ancora molti punti in comune che potrebbero essere esplicitati, ma vorrei concludere questo articolo con una considerazione personale: lasciate che le vostre corde diventino un modo per danzare con il vostro partner. Esprimete voi stessi e focalizzatevi sul perché e sul come fare qualcosa. Provate ogni giorno a migliorarvi e lasciate che il vostro kinbaku sia un bellissimo balletto erotico e non una moda priva di significato o, peggio ancora, poco più che un circo.

3 thoughts on “‘En Pointe’ on The Way we Do Kinbaku

    1. Thanks ^.^ as Shiawase said, we mostly practice during week ends… and I know I still have a lot to learn and to improve!

      Like

  1. ooooh, thank you! We practice a little every weekend.
    For the patience, you have to say it to @andreakurogami. I don’t know how it can be done. :O 😀
    But the entire article is a very important thought that we have about kinbaku

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s